Cultural exchange gives refugees a chance to share memories of home

Refugees are often expected to integrate into their host countries without a deeper understanding of their heritage and home practices’ needs. In 2002, when 2% of the Plymouth population were of BME/MABE backgrounds, the Home Office designated Plymouth as a dispersal centre for asylum seekers in the UK. By 2011, this percentage had risen to…

Portraits and group discussion – Workshop 4

Our project photojournalist, Carey Marks, spent the day working with individual participants. Carey is working on a series of portraits capturing the essence of the person not their status. While photos were taken, the other participants were developing their maps. We paused to ask about crucial issues related to housing, sharing a life, getting on…

Mapping memories through roots and routes – Workshop THREE

Intricate layers of maps and tracing paper were used throughout the workshop. Participants recited their memories of everyday places they visited, lived in and journeyed from their homes. They remembered the roads, the smell, the noise, and the crowds. We discussed how communities practiced their everyday lives and how different and similar that is to…

Mapping and tracing journeys and memories – Workshop TWO

At the end of Workshop ONE we knew that there was an urgency to start Workshop TWO with a story sharing session before moving on to the focus of the workshop which is: mapping and tracing journeys and memories. participants parted with intimate details of their journeys and arrivals to the UK. We discussed the…

Creative Recovery partners and collaborators

The project’s main partner organisation who has acted as the main recruiter for participants is the British Red Cross, Plymouth Branch. The Displacement Studies Research Network (DSRN) played a significant part in creating connections with the project’s main partner (BRC) and other partners such as Plymouth and Devon Racial Equality Council who have emerged as…